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Search Results 0 to 18 of about 19 (some duplicates have been removed)
is the enemy. lyndon johnson if you read about his efforts of mail order purchasing of guns, he moved that measure in a matter of months, and he was the master of this process. and he understood that time really was the enemy in terms of getting these measures through. to be the extent we can get a strong comprehensive package moving in the senate, get it out of the senate, and then basically surround the house with the executive branch senate action and public opinion that then i actually think this could get a life of its own and really have a strong chance. >> john: connecticut democratic congressman joe courtney, thank you for coming on the program. >> thanks, john. >> john: for more now on the president's proposals i'm happy to be joined by john rosenthal. stop handgun violence and common sense about kids an guns, and by pam simon a staffer for gabby giffords who was shot at the tucson shop shooting where the congressman was badly wounded and six others were killed. she's now a gun control advocate advocate. thank you both for joining us, john, i want to begin with you. >> thank
of the democratic party. and yet it set in motion the events that led to the challenging of lyndon johnson. so i think unfortunately history becomes political, and we pick and choose what we refer to emphasize, but dr. king was gradual. he was slow to come to an open stance. he knew what the stakes were. he wasn't unaware. he wasn't innocent. he knew he would have trouble taking that position, and he took it forthrightly, and proudly, and stayed with it. >> john: kris let me ask you the same question. do you think that another great tragedy of dr. king's loss is he's only remembered as a civil rights icon and not as a non-violent resistence icon or labor rights icon. >> he's so much bigger than the box we tend to put him in. in some of those speeches, in the antiwar speeches he was talking about moving beyond tribe, race, class and nation. that's the kind of radical internationalism that we really don't talk about. even president obama's speech today he's saying we're really loyal not to party but to nations. well, king went far beyond that and say we're not loyal to nations. we're loyal to god.
rating as bill clinton at 62% and richard nixon was down to 51% in 1973. both lyndon johnson and dwight eisenhower topped everyone here, they reached the low 70s. they were at 71% and 73% respentively. >> that's pretty impressive. >> those numbers would never exit tod exist today. >>> thousands of people are starting to descend this morning. >> never too early to get ready. this morning, though, we'll look past the oath of office to the next four years. the issues, the plans, the prospects. as joe johns reports, some of the most notorious scandals also happened in the second term. >> reporter: president obama has high hopes for the next four years. >> i intend to carry out the agenda that i campaigned on. >> reporter: if he wants to reach that goal, history says a second-term president has got to move fast. >> power does seep away from the presidency very quickly in the second term. >> second term presidents and their congresses have two different clocks and the president's clock is now moving towards history and the longer view and he can take more risks. the congressional clock is sti
. and finally, when he supports social security, medicaid and medicare, that's straight lyndon johnson, great society talk. this is a speech in the progressive tradition. at some points it's like the second inaugural of franklin roosevelt where fdr in 1937 said be proud you're an individual but there's also a collective. and you guys mentioned the word people, how often he said, we, the people. but this is, we, the people almost in a howard zimm people of america kind of way. this was about ordinary people fighting for ordinary rights, stonewall has replaced normandy. you know, selma has replaced iwo jima. there wasn't a marshal tone, this was about inclusion. >> he used the term we, and he used the term common creed over and over again throughout the speech. norah o'donnell was listening to the speech down there on the national mall. nor norah? >> and, scott, on that theme the president used the word together some seven times. a word he used just once in 2009. and i think you're right, this was in some ways a civil rights speech. because the president said, our journey is not complete. that'
in order to bring us into a new era. one of the things that lyndon johnson said famously is that when a president is elected, he's for six months he's a giraffe and thereafter a worm, so his great challenge is going to be how he figures out how to make the most of this time as a giraffe. >> let's go back outside to so sole ya vega. >> i'm here. hey, good afternoon. we made our way over from the pentagon where we were at the staging area and came over on a bus full of teenager matching band from tennessee. they were really excited and we walked our way through the mall here and made our way close to the capitol. you can see a lot of the crowd is dissipating. a lot are headed over to that paid we'll see later this afternoon. we heard all of our friends, david muir and bill weir talking about the excitement and the level of excitement you can feel just walking through this crowd. it's so palpable. one woman i just met while making my way over stopped me in my tracks during the invocation, she literally had tears streaming down her face and i said why are you so emotional? she said my gra
eisenhower, lyndon johnson, john kennedy, richard nixon, gerald ford, jimmy carter, ronald reagan, george bush, and so on. more recently, george w. bush and barack obama. the tradition has been maintained. when a new president is elected, st. john's makes an effort to contact them and have them sign this historic book, which is a very dear item to the church. it is one of those great pieces of history that has been long associated with this church, from 1856 till the present one of the little-known fact about presidential inaugurations is that it has been the custom in modern times to have a church service, and worship service of some kind before the president takes the oath of office. people feel this is a longstanding tradition. it began with franklin roosevelt on march 4, 1933. when he wished to have a worship service take place before he took the oath of office, in the depths of the great depression. he contacted the church and he organized a special service with his former headmaster at school, who participated in the church with coming up with a special service. the have that servic
the inauguration on television. lyndon johnson made history, the first president to ride to his inaugural in a bullet proof inaugural. ronald reagan's second inaugural, so cold, only snow filled the stands. bill clinton ushering in more than just a second term. the first to be carried on that thing called the internet. >> i, william jefferson clinton. >> reporter: and president obama with the first lady by his side again after already making history four years ago in front of nearly 2 million spectators. david muir, abc news, washington. >> he'll be the first democrat in more than 75 years to get a majority of the popular vote twice. only five other presidents have done that in all u.s. history. i love the trivia behind inauguration. it's interesting to go back in the file that day. fascinating day for the obamas and for the country. so keep it here on abc news throughout this very big day. we'll be back. >>> this morning on "world news now," capitol celebration. washington's big bash as president obama begins his second term. >> the festive atmosphere and the tight security for this inau
, 1969, richard nixon, john f. kennedy in 1961. george h.w. bush in 1989, lyndon johnson from 1965, president jimmy carter in 1977, and we will wrap up the night at 11:00 eastern with president george w. bush speech from 19 -- from 2001. >> i barack hussein obama do solemnly swear that i will execute the office of president of the an ad states faithfully -- >> when chief justice john roberts administered the oath to barack obama on january 20, 2009, there was a major problem. roberts was supposed to say "that i will faithfully execute the office of president of united states. then barack obama stops, paused, smiled, as if to say, "c'mon, man, this is my big day, you got to get this right." unfortunately, he did not get it right, so the very next night in the white house, they did it again. this time roberts used notes which he had not used the first time, and they got it right. >> the history of democracy's big day, monday at 8:00 a.m. part of a three-day holiday "book tv."c-span's >> the house in for a brief protest for a session this afternoon. party leaders have been sounding ou
the second lowest number of murders, 85, since lyndon johnson was president. so we have control around our crime issues. but the number of bullets that are fired from a magazine is something that we want to see stopped. nobody needs more than ten bullets. gun violence, background checks, is something we need to see in cities. so these common sense reforms, you now have more than 750 mayors that are standing behind the president and the vice president. and we think we're going to get a bill. it's going to be hard, it's going to be thank you. but i think we're finally going to get major gun violence reform. >> let's talk about one topic real quick where we know there is not so much partisan politics. very important question, mayor. will the atlanta falcons go to the super bowl? >> oh, no question. we're one game away, kate. we're going. >> all right. >> the objective political analysis from the atlanta mayor there. >> mayor, great to see you. >> thank you, kate. >> thank you so much. >> rooting for the hometown. cnn. >> for the first time, the presidential -- >> atlanta falcons, best in the
aboard air force one when lyndon johnson took the oath of office. there is no constitutional requirement and a woman could add merit oath of office to the president if they choose. but because tradition started with thomas jefferson, i want the chief justice of the united states, that's basically been the unbroken line. eight times it has not been the chief justice. >> probably one of the best inaugurations with the weather. near 40 degrees today. >> the original inauguration day was march 4 because they wanted to get it out of the bad weather. that's when one president william henry harrison died in cold and drafty weather. they did not like the lame duck sessions that were causing everyone grief, they moved it to january 20. that started in 1937. >> all right. thanks. >> michael will be with us throughout the morning. we'll be talking inauguration and carrying it for you live. there's the vice president biden coming out right now. the ceremony will start in about 20 minutes. >> we'll get back to washington, d.c. first in the bay area we're looking at nice weather. >> good morning. temp
part. lyndon johnson did, bill clinton did. he doesn't. >> so even though the kids are going to be out of the house, so to speak, you don't expect him to change? >> i think it would being a great. designee just made a joke the kids are moving out, come on over. >> it's >>> the cars of tomorrow, they're on display today at the detroit auto show. we'll show you the cars and the truck that give you the best bang for your buck. >>> and take look at the groundbreaking new corvette stingray. all right. pretty. you're watching "cbs this morning." t he do it with >> announcer: this morning's eye opener at 8:00 is brought to you by sponsor with an inside story on shingles. democrats? e >>> planning for your retirement is more important than ever, so why are more people raiding their 401(k)s to pay their bills? "moneywatch" jill schlesinger is back and she'll show you why it's so important to save and why it's so important to never touch your 401(k). >>> a little later? >>> i'm charlie d'agata in london and i'll tell you why the great british butler is making a g
, the first president to actually ride in a bulletproof car was lyndon johnson in 1965, michael shure. the first president to ride in a car at all, excuse me, david shuster, are you there? the first president to ride in a ceremony in a car was warren harding back in 1921. so shuster, can you see from where you are. you've got a unique spot looking back at the capitol. can you see any of that happening? >> yeah, we can see over to constitution avenue. can see the crowds blocked off. we can see the monitor. what i wanted to say about the motorcade is a couple of things. first of all, in order to prepare pennsylvania avenue for this path, they removed something like 25 different stoplights that were on poles and the other thing that they do as part of security is early this morning, the electric company and gas company will go manhole cover by manhole cover, prop them open, make sure nothing is underneath and put a little x of spray paint and we would it shut. they know that pennsylvania avenue has been cleared. so it is a fascinating process to get pennsylvania ready for this motorcade.
johnson. that's true. >> anybody compared to bill clinton and lyndon johnson -- not going to change really in that sense. he is who he is. he doesn't want to appear to be inauthentic about it. one of the things about bill clinton was he was what i call an authentic phony. everybody believed what he was saying at the moment. barack obama always had more difficult time trying to act that up. but as he said the other day, you know, he is a nice enough guy. echoed what he said about hillary. nice enough, too. >> that line didn't go over so well the first time. >> he was talking about himself a little easier maybe. >> maybe. but do -- does he enjoy politics? >> yes. well, he enjoys politics but enjoys other things as well. you know, i -- i think that he -- he's learning how to really sort of merge that with the other aspects of what he enjoys which is policy and rest of life. >> can i say two words? joe biden. that's what joe biden is for. he does the things the president really dislikes doing. i mean, it is -- if the president doesn't like to glad hand and hang out with members of congress, th
kennedy in 1961. george w. bush in 19 99. lyndon johnson that from 1965. jimmy carter from 1977. we will wrap up with george w. bush from 2001. starting tonight at 8:00 pm on c-span. >> i barack hussein obama do solemnly swear -- , --[no audio]>> the official swearing ceremony at the white house before noon eastern. our coverage includes your phone calls and a look back at the 2009 presidential inaugural address. the public and inaugural ceremony will be swearing in at noon eastern at the us capitol and other festivities, including the capitol luncheon and parade. live coverage begins at 7:00 a.m. eastern time. join the conversation by phone, facebook, and on twitter. >> you can see the crews finishing up work between the white house and the capitol getting ready for the inauguration. you can see in front of the white house off of the inaugural parade on monday. some of the finishing touches are going up. there is a presidential seal attached to a heated glassed in area. that is where president obama and michelle obama will watch the parade. the city of washington has spent $6.5 mil
, and lyndon b. johnson in six years as majority leader faced one, and harry reid has faced 361 in the same six-year period. and even if you have the 60 votes to end one, they take up the power of the senate. >> stephanie: you know what is interesting. they just did this study -- this is no surprise to you, but the 112th congress was the most polarized ever. the distance between the two due to record levels between the 111th and 112th even different than the before when they used to take out pistols and shoot each over. >> yes. >> stephanie: i look at poll after poll -- i mean 90% of the american people want background checks for gun -- and you think -- and yet you hear over and over we're probably not going to be able to get any of this gun stuff done. but this is part of the reason right? >> it is part of the reason. why are we talking about reducing food stamps and hunger programs at a time when we can't even close a loophole for a oil company. well, it's a filibuster. dream act, why couldn't we do it? filibuster. and we had 59 votes to close debate, and we needed 6
, lyndon b. johnson in 1963. james in brandon, florida on our republican line. good morning. caller: good morning. thank you for taking my call. i wanted to ask the country to pray for our president obama -- i am a republican, and i voted republican this year. that was to my commitment to the republican party. i am very disappointed with my party. i do not like the direction they are taking. to be honest with you, i do not like the fact that they are not cooperating in the house or any other place with democrats or with president obama. i would ask the president if he would open upper a new investigation on the 9/11 attacks on this country. i am unsatisfied with the commission report that was put out. host: that was james in brandon, florida. you can see on the capital, five large flags hanging down. the explanation of the five different flags they had hanging down -- this is a congressional report. framed against the black -- the backdrop -- the backdrop of red, white and blue -- we have at ross flag with starch -- stars are arranged in the circle. the next two flags are the flags the u.
Search Results 0 to 18 of about 19 (some duplicates have been removed)